NASA is funding asteroid spaceships and different far-out ideas

NASA is funding asteroid spaceships and other far-out concepts

NASA’s annual Nationwide Progressive Superior Ideas (NIAC) program awards cash to a few of the craziest area tasks you will ever see, and this yr is not any totally different. The area company has simply introduced the thirteen ideas that made it by way of Part I, and one of the crucial fascinating entries plans to rework entire asteroids into spaceships. It is referred to as Reconstituting Asteroids into Mechanical Automata or Venture RAMA. The idea is the brainchild of Jason Dunn, co-founding father of Made In Area, which developed the 3D printer that is aboard the ISS.

Dunn needs to ship out analog computer systems and mechanisms to rendezvous with asteroids and switch them into autonomous spacecraft. They might then be used to eliminate objects that would collide with our planet, amongst different attainable missions. One other venture goals to create autonomous underwater drones that may dive to the middle of icy moons via their volcanoes, identical to in Jules Verne’s basic. Yet one more needs to make use of microbes to recycle previous spacecraft elements to make new ones. There’s additionally one that desires to ship out a skinny, kite-like spacecraft to filter out all of the particles in Low Earth Orbit.

All these Part I tasks are getting a $one hundred,000 grant from NASA to fund their feasibility research for the subsequent 9 months. These that may show that their wild concepts aren’t simply sci-fi fodder might get $500,000 extra to develop their ideas for the subsequent two years. In 2015, NASA awarded seven tasks with half one million, together with one which plans to ship photo voltaic-powered robots to work on the floor of the moon. The company invests cash in these seemingly unattainable ideas to “push boundaries and discover new approaches” for the way forward for area exploration.

By way of: TechCrunch
Supply: NASA, (2)
Protection: Gizmag
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